The Consumption of Love

January 01, 2015  •  Leave a Comment

My wife Gigi noticed a black rose bud (Baccarat Hybrid) covered in aphids while pruning our roses. She called me over to check it out. I grabbed a vase and then cut the bud to put into the studio while I set up for the image. Carrying the rose to the studio, I was thinking of a title as that is the area I struggle with most. Although at the time I came up with “All Consuming Love”, I eventually settled on “The Consumption of Love” when this image went to Gallery Azul for one of their shows.

The image set-up follows:

  1. For the backdrop, I used black felt draped over backdrop supports.
  2. The rose was held in position by an alligator clip soldered onto a thin metal rod and held to a light stand by a clamp. I did not want the rose to remain in the vase to eliminate reflections off the glass.
  3. The camera was a Canon EOS-1D Mark II with a Canon 100mm macro lens. I wanted most of the rose to be in focus, so I set the lens to f32 and the shutter to 1/160 sec and ISO 100.
  4. To light the rose, I decided against using my DynaLite strobes, instead opting for my Canon Macro ring light. But, I wanted to emphasize the texture and depth from the aphids, so instead of mounting the light to the lens, I hand held the light as far as I could stretch the cable from the camera’s hot shoe. The final position was to the camera’s left of the rose about 12 inches above it. I also added a small reflector under the rose to get a bit of light onto the stem to eliminate a rose floating in space.

Image editing beyond levels, curves, and sharpening (I always shoot RAW). I did not like the bright green of the aphids against the deep blackish red of the rose, so I knew this would be some form of a black and white image.

  1. The first conversion to B&W was the use of NIK Silver Efex Pro. To get maintain some of the rose’s coloring, I set the opacity of this layer at 87%.
  2. To completely eliminate the green of the aphids, I processed the image again in Silver Efex Pro. But this time I masked the petals of the rose to protect the red and convert the aphids to white with the remaining areas also converting fully to B&W.

 Shot: March 28, 2008

 

The Consumption of LoveThe Consumption of LoveMy wife Gigi noticed this black rose bud (Baccarat Hybrid) covered in aphids while pruning our roses. She called me over to check it out. I grabbed a vase and then cut the bud to put into the studio while I set up for the image. Carrying the rose to the studio, I was thinking of a title as that is the area I struggle with most. Although at the time I came up with “All Consuming Love”, I eventually settled on “The Consumption of Love” when this image went to Gallery Azul for one of their shows.

The image set-up follows:

1)For the backdrop, I used black felt draped over backdrop supports.
2)The rose was held in position by an alligator clip soldered onto a thin metal rod and held to a light stand by a clamp. I did not want the rose to remain in the vase to eliminate reflections off the glass.
3)The camera was a Canon EOS-1D Mark II with a Canon 100mm macro lens. I wanted most of the rose to be in focus, so I set the lens to f32 and the shutter to 1/160 sec and ISO 100.
4)To light the rose, I decided against using my DynaLite strobes, instead opting for my Canon Macro ring light. But, I wanted to emphasize the texture and depth from the aphids, so instead of mounting the light to the lens, I hand held the light as far as I could stretch the cable from the camera’s hot shoe. The final position was to the camera’s left of the rose about 12 inches above it. I also added a small reflector under the rose to get a bit of light onto the stem to eliminate a rose floating in space.

Image editing beyond levels, curves, and sharpening (I always shoot RAW). I did not like the bright green of the aphids against the deep blackish red of the rose, so I knew this would be some form of a black and white image.
1)The first conversion to B&W was the use of NIK Silver Efex Pro. To get maintain some of the rose’s coloring, I set the opacity of this layer at 87%.
2)To completely eliminate the green of the aphids, I processed the image again in Silver Efex Pro.

 

I just submitted this image to Shutterbug for their "Picture This" section of their magazine: http://www.shutterbug.com/content/consumption-love


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