Fireworks off the Tripod

July 04, 2014  •  Leave a Comment

Firework Explosion_MG_0130Firework Explosion_MG_0130© Reidar Schopp, All Rights Reserved, www.RLSFoto.com. Shot from my house. Early images are on a tripod, but the later are handheld with my 500mm lens. There are too many power lines on obstacles so by handholding and moving the lens during the time exposure, I am expecting the obstacles to disappear.
Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:6.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}


This image is actually 2 composited images. The first is the blue burst, the second is the multi trails leading to the burst. Each were handheld 1.5 seconds at f5.6 shot with my 500mm Canon. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:6.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}

Every year I see photo magazines give advice on how to shoot fireworks for the fourth of July celebrations. Use a tripod, expose for a few seconds, set the f-stop to f16, etc. You will succeed in capturing the same images as everyone else. Although I do use a tripod for part of the firework displays, I have more fun handholding the camera but still maintaining a long exposure. I change the exposure between 2 seconds down to ½ second as well as the f-stop with it ranging from f5.6 to f16. It depends on is we have a clear night, the amount of ambient light, the amount of smoke in the air, etc.

The above image is actually two, each shot at 1.5 seconds and f5.6 using a 500mm Canon lens (jokingly called my Africa Lens) The first image is the blue burst that I tracked via the rocket trail (seen coming out of the upper left and to the center of the sky rocket’s explosion. The second image of this composite are the trails leading from the center of the explosion in the first image to the lower right edge. This was the remains after a firework exploded and I was just moving the lens across the sky.

Break the rules, step away from what everyone else is doing. Always experiment and try different approaches. You will be astonished at some of the images that appear on your computer screen.


Comments

No comments posted.
Loading...